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Reading to your children: a special time to learn

The Daily Extra – Lydia Olsen

“We all can remember those special times when a story was read to us, whether at home by somebody we love, at school, or maybe at the library. The story came to life, and we were enthralled with the words. The magic of story reading is a powerful tool. At least 55 percent of Utah’s parents read to their children ages 0-5 everyday compared to 47.9 percent of the nation, according to a survey conducted by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention National Center of Health Statistics. Why does reading aloud matter so much? Those children in the 55 percent of Utah families who are read to daily are developing literacy skills and language awareness. They have larger vocabularies, which at age 3 is a large predictor of language skill and reading comprehension for ages 9 and 10. But the benefits of reading aloud aren’t just linguistic; spending that time together can also build relationships between parents and children.”(more)

Everyday Learners: The benefits of children reading poetry

The Daily Herald Extra – Lydia Olsen

“Many parents take the time to read picture books and board books to their young children every day. But did you know poetry can also be very beneficial for children? Reading poetry aloud to and with your young children can have benefits that last for years. There are many reasons why poetry is significant for young readers. Research has shown that poetry motivates children to read, builds phonemic awareness and builds essential skills like vocabulary, fluency, expression, and writing. Each of these is crucial for children to develop in order to become strong readers.”(more)

Students’ self-concepts of ability in math, reading predict later math, reading attainment

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Educational and developmental psychologists have tried to understand how skills and motivation are linked to academic achievement. While research supports ties between individuals’ concepts of their abilities and their achievement, we lack a complete picture of how these relations develop from childhood to adolescence. A new longitudinal study looked at how youths’ self-concepts are linked to their actual academic achievement in math and reading from middle childhood to adolescence. The study found that students’ self-concepts of their abilities in these two academic domains play an important role in motivating their achievements over time and across levels of achievement.”(more)

Getting Everyone on the Same Page

Edutopia – Robert Ward

“English teachers are typically literature lovers, so it’s natural for them to share their passion for reading with their students by introducing them to great books. However, some teachers find the prospect of reading and analyzing an entire novel with their classes to be overwhelming or problematic. Their most common concerns center around these questions:.”(more)

3 benefits of independent reading—and how to make it work in your classroom

Education Dive – Staff Writer

“Can school actually diminish a child’s love of reading? When students lack choice about the books they read, it can limit their enjoyment and motivation to read. Enter independent reading programs: Students can naturally find they love to read and build confidence when they choose their own reading materials. And as a result, independent reading programs can help improve comprehension, vocabulary and fluency.”(more)

How should we handle boys who can’t read?

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“Many people know that girls, on average, are worse at math than boys. But the gender difference is three times greater when it comes to reading. According to international studies, this is where boys struggle. Why? And what can be done about it? For starters, children who struggle most with learning to read could be identified earlier than is currently done. And now, researchers are finding new ways to do this.”(more)