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‘Depression education’ effective for some teens

Science Daily – Staff Writer

“In an assessment of their “depression literacy” program, which has already been taught to tens of thousands, Johns Hopkins researchers say the Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP) achieved its intended effect of encouraging many teenagers to speak up and seek adult help for themselves or a peer. The program provides selected high school teachers a curriculum geared to students in ninth or 10th grade in the required health education classes.” (more)

Why Your School Should Be Implementing Trauma-Informed Practices

Education World – Jim Paterson

“From severe bullying, emotional abuse, or death of a parent at home to a classmate’s suicide or a school shooting, we now know trauma diminishes the performance and good behavior of students―and limits their health and happiness as adults. It is harder, however, to see how the many proposed approaches to combat it can be implemented consistently during a busy school day, but experts say professional development is a good start.”(more)

Don’t Call It ‘Guidance’ Anymore: A Talk With The Nation’s Top School Counselor

NPR – Elissa Nadworny

“Counselors play a big role in helping students succeed: They help with scheduling, college applications and with issues like mental health. Since 2015, first lady Michelle Obama has honored a school counselor of the year in a ceremony at the White House. Friday, the honor goes to Terri Tchorzynski of the Calhoun Area Career Center in Battle Creek, Mich., where she works with 11th- and 12th-graders drawn from 20 public high schools in Calhoun County. Tchorzynski started her career as a high school English teacher, before getting her master’s degree in counseling — a role she says she “always knew she wanted.” NPR Ed caught up with Tchorzynski about her work in Michigan and the important role she sees counselors playing in schools.”(more)

The 6 education stories to watch in 2017

The Minnesota Post – Erin Hinrichs

“When it comes to education issues, the term “community engagement” gets tossed around a lot — and rightfully so. In order for local policy makers and educators to make greater strides toward closing the achievement gap they need to hear from those who are too often left out of these conversations. Parents, students and community members are best positioned to bring attention to inequities that exist within the current education system, whether it be disparities in disciplinary actions or in who is encouraged to enroll in dual-enrollment courses for college credit.”(more)

3 Ways Schools Can Be Supportive of Students’ Mental Health

KQED News Mind/Shift – Meg Anderson

“About one in five children in the United States shows signs of a mental health disorder — anything from ADHD to eating disorders to suicide. And yet, as we’ve been reporting this month, many schools aren’t prepared to work with these students. Often, there’s been too little training in recognizing the problems, the staff who are trained are overworked, and there just isn’t enough money. When there are enough people to handle the job, how should all the different roles fit together? Many experts point to one model. It’s got a bureaucratic name — the “multi-tiered system of supports” — but when you picture it, just imagine an upside-down pyramid, or maybe a funnel.”(more)

Study Indicates Positive Teacher-Student Relationships Might Be More Effective Than Counseling, Anti-Bullying Programs

Education World – Nicole Gorman

“If there was any question about how important the role of a teacher in a child’s life is, a new study has substantiated this further with some new evidence. Members of the Violence Research Centre at Cambridge’s Institute of Criminology and colleagues from both ETH Zurich and the University of Toronto arrived at the conclusion that positive relationships with teachers for middle school aged students is likely to reduce aggressive behavior for four years through analysis of nearly a decade’s worth of data. The researchers analyzed “data from eight ‘waves’ of a major longitudinal study of culturally-diverse Swiss youth being schooled across Zurich. The latest study involved 1,067 students randomly sampled across 56 of the city’s schools,” said the University of Cambridge in a release.”(more)