RSI Corporate - Licensing

‘It’s Not My Problem!’ Why Charter Schools and Districts Need to Work Together on the Politics of School Closure

Education Next – Robin J. Lake and Alice Opalka

“District budgets are badly strained when many of their schools are under-enrolled. This is one of the biggest reasons that districts with growing charter enrollment hit financial hurdles. Meanwhile, charter schools can’t expand without access to facilities, and in a growing number of cities, suitable facilities are in very short supply. Understandably, charter leaders bristle when they are blamed for budget woes that may be easily solved by consolidating under-enrolled schools. And understandably, district leaders think they wouldn’t have the under-enrollment problem if charter schools weren’t pulling away students.”(more)

Examining the Role of Schools in Helping Students Become Good Digital Citizens

Education World – Joel Stice

“Harvard University recently made headlines when it withdrew admission for ten would-be freshmen because of racist comments in a private Facebook group. The news raises the question of how much monitoring schools should be doing of their student’s social media activity, and what kind of responsibility do they have to teach internet etiquette? With everything from bullying to sexual harassment, spilling over from social media sites to campuses, schools around the country are beginning to take a more watchful approach to what students post online.”(more)

3 States Cite School Climate Surveys in Their ESSA Plans. Why Don’t Others Use Culture for Accountability?

The 74 Million – Kate Stringer

“Of the dozen state ESSA plans that have been submitted so far to the U.S. Department of Education, most have nothing but praise for school climate surveys as measurements of school quality. But when it comes to actually using surveys as accountability measures, most states back away. Only three states — Illinois, Nevada, and New Mexico — have school climate surveys as part of their “fifth indicator,” a new accountability tool in the Every Student Succeeds Act that lets states grade schools on measures other than reading and math scores. The others are turning to measures like chronic absenteeism, suspension rates, or college and career readiness instead.”(more)

Bystander Buy-In: A Transformative Bullying Intervention Strategy

Education World – Jim Paterson

“New approaches to bullying intervention often focus less frequently today on the two students directly involved in the behavior―the bully and victim―and increasingly on the new approaches for bystanders and their key role in preventing incidents and reporting them. Getting witnesses to help stop bullies may mean training them in less traditional ways, experts say, involving social and emotional learning and even use of new technology that can make it easier and safer for them to act.”(more)

How to Beat Teacher Burnout: With More Education

Governing – Liz Farmer

“When mathematician John Ewing started lobbying state governments to adopt a new model for keeping top teachers in the classroom, he anticipated all the usual pushback over funding and resources. One thing he didn’t anticipate was a resistance to the idea in general. In education right now, “the focus is on everything that’s not working,” he says. By contrast, his model “invests in teachers that are doing a really good job.” In 2009, fellow mathematician and philanthropist Jim Simons called and asked Ewing to help him take over his fledgling nonprofit to provide continuing education for K-12 math teachers in New York City. But the organization, called Math for America (MfA), eventually evolved into a larger fellowship program aimed at cultivating and keeping top science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) teachers in public schools.”(more)

6 tips for a successful one-to-one rollout

E-School News – Laura Ascione

“Nowadays, one-to-one initiatives aren’t anything new. Even I, a journalist with no experience as an educator, have successfully deployed and maintained a one-to-one iPad Mini initiative for my two children. But rolling out a school- or district-wide one-to-one program takes a lot more than choosing a device. It’s a fairly massive undertaking if done correctly, because before school leaders and educators even choose a device, they have to outline teaching and learning goals and find the right digital content to support those goals. One of the first steps is to figure out what you want teaching and learning in your district to look like. Logical next steps are to determine the tools and actions to get you to that place, as well as involving all stakeholder groups along the way.”(more)