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Guiding Students to Science Literacy

Edutopia – Jayne Lecky

“It’s said that science asks questions (the scientific method) and engineering solves problems (the engineering design process). In order to have a truly inquiry-based science classroom, there must be both questions and answers. They may not all be the right questions and answers, but coming up with them takes students to true science literacy. But we can’t simply tell our students to solve a problem—we must give them a structured process to do so.” (more)

5 ways to buoy early science learning at home

E-School News – Laura Ascione

“More parents would focus on science-related activities with their young children if they knew how to actually engage in such activities, according to a new survey. The survey from Education Development Center (EDC) and SRI International includes data from more than 1,400 parents of young children ages 3 to 6—many of whom (63 percent) are from low-income households. One of the biggest takeaways from the results? Science for young children doesn’t have to involve expensive devices or equipment—it can be as simple as encouraging inquiry, curiosity, and asking “Why?” with young children.” (more)

Santa Claus and Newton’s Three Laws of Motion

Education World – Leigh O. Cody

“Provide the following scenarios to students. You might cut and paste the text below and present the text to students as a work sheet. Directions: Identify which of Newton’s Laws of Motion is being demonstrated in each of the following scenarios:.”(more)

Students need tech skills for more than just jobs — they need it to be good citizens

The Seattle Times – Jerry Large

“You’ve heard many times the complaint that Washington state is not preparing enough of its students for high-tech jobs. Job preparation is a good reason for making a high-quality math and science education more broadly available, but there is another increasingly important reason to move quickly to give young people a solid grounding in those areas of study. This country desperately needs a science-literate citizenry. Reading is fundamental, the arts are essential and history is a must. But more than at any time in our development, an understanding of math and science has become crucial in our political and personal lives. And we’re not where we need to be in preparing Americans with a solid base of understanding in any of those areas.”(more)

The Key To America’s Future? Science

NPR Marcelo Gleiser

“How many Americans realize that one of the greatest, if not the greatest, legacies of this country are its amazing universities, incubators of some of the most creative ideas in the past 100 years? Ideas that have changed the world, that have shaped the way we live, that have saved (and taken) countless lives, that pave the way for what the future will be like. Manned missions to Mars, the privatization of the space race, self-driving cars, the explosion of social media platforms, renewable energy sources, the endless pursuit for new cures and vaccines, smart robots, ultrafast computers — these are the technologies that will define the 21st century, and they all depend crucially on science and scientific research.”(more)

Science Literacy And The 2016 Presidential Election

The Huffington Post – Dr. Mae C. Jemison

“Throughout my career, whether aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavor, practicing medicine in Los Angeles and Sierra Leone or promoting sustainable development, I’ve experienced firsthand the incredible impact that can be made when we invest in science and technology R&D and science education. As a result, I know that our country stands at a critical point in the world and in U.S. history. The best paths forward to meet the demand – the imperative – to improve human quality of life while not overburdening this planet must be identified and executed. And frankly, collectively, consciously or unconsciously, we look to science for solutions to this conundrum.”(more)