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Teachers lacking educational background in science use inquiry-oriented instruction least

Science Daily – Staff Writer

“A new study shows that eighth-grade science teachers without an educational background in science are less likely to practice inquiry-oriented science instruction, a pedagogical approach that develops students’ understanding of scientific concepts and engages students in hands-on science projects. This research offers new evidence for why U.S. middle-grades students may lag behind their global peers in scientific literacy. Inquiry-oriented science instruction has been heralded by the National Research Council and other experts in science education as best practice for teaching students 21st-century scientific knowledge and skills.” (more)

Pair the Plants: An Introduction to Scientific Names

Education World – Staff Writer

“In this activity, students use online or library resources to learn more about some common plants. They match the common names of those plants with their scientific names on the Education World Pair the Plant Names work sheet.” (more)

Guiding Students to Science Literacy

Edutopia – Jayne Lecky

“It’s said that science asks questions (the scientific method) and engineering solves problems (the engineering design process). In order to have a truly inquiry-based science classroom, there must be both questions and answers. They may not all be the right questions and answers, but coming up with them takes students to true science literacy. But we can’t simply tell our students to solve a problem—we must give them a structured process to do so.” (more)

Pair the Plants: An Introduction to Scientific Names

Education World – Staff Writer

“In this activity, students use online or library resources to learn more about some common plants. They match the common names of those plants with their scientific names on the Education World Pair the Plant Names work sheet. Start the lesson by explaining to students that most plants have both common names and scientific names. That might be confusing to students, but you can explain that the system of giving scientific names to plants resulted from the fact that scientists were confused too!” (more)

3 ways to help students think and act as scientists

E-School News – Ryan Reardon

“I enjoy challenging students to engage in hands-on scientific inquiry. In fact, I’m always telling my students and colleagues that I don’t want our students to think and act like scientists. I want them to think and act as scientists. Here are three things we can do to make that happen.” (more)

Famous African American Inventors

Scholastic – Staff Writer

“Meet 14 inventors who changed history with their contributions to science, industry, business, agriculture, transportation, and communication. Think about what kind of obstacles they may have faced, both personally and professionally.” (more)