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Pair the Plants: An Introduction to Scientific Names

Education World – Staff Writer

“In this activity, students use online or library resources to learn more about some common plants. They match the common names of those plants with their scientific names on the Education World Pair the Plant Names work sheet.” (more)

5 ways to buoy early science learning at home

E-School News – Laura Ascione

“More parents would focus on science-related activities with their young children if they knew how to actually engage in such activities, according to a new survey. The survey from Education Development Center (EDC) and SRI International includes data from more than 1,400 parents of young children ages 3 to 6—many of whom (63 percent) are from low-income households. One of the biggest takeaways from the results? Science for young children doesn’t have to involve expensive devices or equipment—it can be as simple as encouraging inquiry, curiosity, and asking “Why?” with young children.” (more)

3 ways to help students think and act as scientists

E-School News – Ryan Reardon

“I enjoy challenging students to engage in hands-on scientific inquiry. In fact, I’m always telling my students and colleagues that I don’t want our students to think and act like scientists. I want them to think and act as scientists. Here are three things we can do to make that happen.” (more)

Famous African American Inventors

Scholastic – Staff Writer

“Meet 14 inventors who changed history with their contributions to science, industry, business, agriculture, transportation, and communication. Think about what kind of obstacles they may have faced, both personally and professionally.” (more)

Diversity at the front of the classroom could mean more diversity among future scientists

The Hechinger Report – Tara García Mathewson

“Lithium, the element, burns red. The flame for sodium is a strong orange. With potassium, it’s pink. Before he did a flame test in his chemistry class at Woodrow Wilson High School in Camden, N.J., 16-year-old Naysaan Benson thought fire only had two colors – orange and red. The experiment surprised him. “There was green, red, orange, yellow,” Benson said. Now he understands how fireworks get their color.” (more)