RSI Corporate - Licensing

Shanghai’s latest export to the UK: math

Shanghai Daily – You Zhixin, Zheng Kaijun and Wu Zhendong

“THE English version of a popular set of Shanghai math books which debuted at the recent Shanghai Book Fair attracted a great number of interested Chinese readers. Chinese publishers and scholars have been inspired by the introduction of Shanghai math books to the United Kingdom and are bringing the fruit of such exchanges back to the city. In Britain, pupils may need to sharpen their pencils in preparation to do math “the Shanghai way.”(more)

China Focus: Deciphering the Shanghai math myths

Xinhua – You Zhixin, Zheng Kaijun, and Wu Zhendong

“The English version of a popular set of Shanghai math books debuted at the Shanghai Book Fair and attracted a great number of interested Chinese readers. Chinese publishers and scholars are inspired by the introduction of Shanghai math books to the UK and they are bringing back the fruit of such exchanges back to Shanghai. While in Britain, pupils may need to sharpen their pencils in preparation to do math “the Shanghai way.”(more)

Britain Turns to Chinese Textbooks to Improve Its Math Scores

The New York Times – Amy Qin

“Educators around the world were stunned when students in Shanghai came first in their international standardized testing debut, in 2010, besting their counterparts in dozens of countries in what some called a Sputnik-like moment. Now, some British schools will try to replicate that success by using translated textbooks that are otherwise all but identical to those in public elementary schools around Shanghai. Starting in January, teachers in England will have the option of using “Real Shanghai Mathematics,” a series of 36 textbooks translated directly from Chinese into English. The only difference? The renminbi symbols will be replaced by British pound signs.”(more)

Chinese maths textbooks to be translated for UK schools

The Guardian – Benjamin Haas and Sally Weale

“British students may soon study mathematics with Chinese textbooks after a “historic” deal between HarperCollins and a Shanghai publishing house in which books will be translated for use in UK schools. China’s wealthy cities, including Shanghai and Beijing, produce some of the world’s top-performing maths pupils, while British students rank far behind their counterparts in Asia. HarperCollins’s education division signed an agreement to release a series of 36 maths books at the London Book Fair, the state-run China Daily reported, with Colin Hughes, managing director of Collins Learning, calling it “historic”.”(more)

Learning Chinese has enriched life

Shanghai Daily – Imogen

“WITH only a few weeks left at school, I’m already counting down the days until my time in China sadly comes to an end. Over the past nine and a half years, I have had the opportunity to really explore another culture, and of course, to learn the language in Shanghai…After finishing school and leaving Shanghai, I hope to be able to put my language skills to good use…Even if in the future I don’t use Chinese directly in my studies or future job, learning Chinese has provided me with several priceless skills. Most importantly, it’s provided me with the confidence needed to make mistakes and continue to improve and use a foreign language in everyday situations. Also, I have also learned to fully explore and be part of a different culture, enriching my life and allowing me to make the most of my time abroad. Finally, learning Chinese has enabled me to develop an open mind and interact with a wide range of people. These are skills which will be invaluable in my future.”(more)

World Bank Study Shows Shanghai’s #1 Global Ranking in Reading, Math, & Science Rests on Strong Education System with Great Teachers

The World Bank – Staff Writer

“A new World Bank report shows that Shanghai’s stellar performance on international tests of student learning is linked to a strong education system with efficient public financing. Shanghai’s policies and investments have created a great teacher workforce, established clear learning standards and regular student assessments, and struck a balance between autonomy and accountability in school management. The comprehensive evaluation was conducted using SABER, the World Bank’s global platform for benchmarking education systems, and complemented with detailed school surveys. Released today, “How Shanghai Does It,” notes that the city’s education system stands out as one of the strongest in the world because it translates smart education policies into excellent learning results. Backed by this dynamic system, Shanghai has topped two consecutive rounds of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) tests in reading, mathematics and science. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) administers these tests to assess how well 15-year-olds have acquired the knowledge and skills needed to fully participate in knowledge-driven societies.”(more)