RSI Corporate - Licensing

STEM education: plugging the global skills shortage

Relocate Magazine – Staff Writer

A consequence of this is a burgeoning global careers market for highly-skilled STEM graduates and school leavers.Today, international businesses demand ever more talent to help them compete in global marketplaces. These businesses also have higher than ever expectations of their young recruits too. This view is endorsed by ‘Inspiring Growth’, the CBI/Pearson Education Skills Survey, which cites that a degree in a science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) subject can give graduates a clear advantage in the jobs market.”(more)

Schools and industry should join forces to reduce skills gap – Marc Durando

Horizon Magazine – Marc Durando

“Schools and industry should join forces to increase the level of skills in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) and better prepare pupils for careers in the sector, according to Marc Durando, Executive Director of European Schoolnet, a network of 31 European ministries of education. All industrial sectors need qualified professionals in STEM to boost the pace of innovation, employment and productivity, and consequently Europe’s ability to compete globally.”(more)

Get rid of the education bureaucracy and kids’ hearts will sing

News Herald – Juliann Talkington

Juliann

It’s technology married with liberal arts, married with the humanities, that yields the results that make our hearts sing. – Steve Jobs, founder of Apple

Steve Jobs made highly technical machines user-friendly and beautiful by blending mathematics, science, and art. More importantly, he started a wave of innovation that made products that were once only accessible to scientists and engineers readily available to the general public.

During this period of innovation, the education sector was stuck in a time warp. Most primary and secondary students today are educated in about the same way that they were in the 1980s.

Counselors continue to place students into STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math), humanities, and trade tracks rather than encourage a broad education. Teaching credentials are still more important than an amazing understanding of the subject and schools are still accredited by personnel from other schools rather than by the market. Also, the majority of U.S. students attend schools run by the government.

Regulations and peer review accreditations may have been necessary in the middle of the 20th Century. However, the same regulations and accrediting bodies that protected our kids then are forcing schools to operate in ways that are inconsistent with 21st Century realities. In short, this means kids are wasting years of their lives on things that no longer matter.

For education to keep pace with the times, there must be a complete paradigm shift. Instead of regulating and delaying change, we need to encourage the education sector to innovate.

To make sure new ideas make it into the education system we need to encourage more private schooling options. Then we need to urge these schools to try radical concepts and provide concrete information on what students are learning. Finally, we need to make sure all students have access to these innovative schools.

The easiest way to make all this happen is to issue education vouchers that can be used at any school and require schools to publish third party test results each year.

With this type of competition, all schools should become better. When the schools become better, our kids will be better prepared. When our kids are better prepared, the country will be more vibrant. When the country is more vibrant, the economy will be better. When the economy is stronger, everyone will be better off.

It is time to get rid of the bureaucracy and allow our schools to innovate so our kids’ hearts can sing.

 

Thinking differently in education to deliver breadth of skills

Brookings – Rebecca Winthrop, Eileen McGivney and Timothy P. Williams

“Schools, teachers, parents, and students in rich and poor countries alike must transform the teaching and learning environment to catch up and keep pace with rapid advances in technology, major changes to the world of work, and to solve complex global challenges. This means mastering literacy, numeracy, and content in traditional academic subjects, but also requires young people who can think critically, solve problems and collaborate with diverse groups of people. Rather than a narrow set of competencies, education must deliver the breadth of skills urgently needed not only in the labor market but also for helping solve some of the most world’s most pressing social problems…The good news is that there is renewed global consensus to do just this.”(more)

New Duke study: Early attention skills most consistent predictor of academic success

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution – Maureen Downey

“A new Duke University study suggests problems paying attention in school in early childhood can foreshadow academic challenges later, including graduating from high school. Such students are 40 percent less likely to graduate, according to the study…The study confirms what many teachers have pointed out on the blog: Patterns are set early. Teachers often say they can predict in fifth grade which students will fail to finish high school…With this study, researchers examined early academic, attention and socioemotional skills and how each contributed to academic success into young adulthood. They found early attention skills were the most consistent predictor of academic success.”(more)

49ers Launch Football and STEM Academy Summer Camp Program

Forty Niners Football Company – Emily Lucas

“Last week, the San Francisco 49ers launched its Football and STEM Academy summer camp program to extend the organization’s impact on youth education about football and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) concepts…In addition to discovering the important values of education and fitness, the camp afforded students with specially-designed activities that teach the fundamentals of football and STEM while learning how to apply important life skills such as respect, responsibility, sportsmanship and teamwork.”(more)