RSI Corporate - Licensing

The Importance of Sleep and Strategies For Sleeping Better

KQED News Mind/Shift – Terry Gross

“The National Sleep Foundation recommends an average of eight hours of sleep per night for adults, but sleep scientist Matthew Walker says that too many people are falling short of the mark. “Human beings are the only species that deliberately deprive themselves of sleep for no apparent gain,” Walker says. “Many people walk through their lives in an underslept state, not realizing it.” Walker is the director of the Center for Human Sleep Science at the University of California, Berkeley. He points out that lack of sleep — defined as six hours or fewer — can have serious consequences. Sleep deficiency is associated with problems in concentration, memory and the immune system, and may even shorten life span.”(more)

A hard lesson—the way poor sleep impacts on schooling

Medical X-Press – Staff Writer

“More than a third of primary school children are failing to get sufficient sleep, according to research to be presented at the British Sleep Society conference tomorrow (October 12th). The study has linked poor sleep with difficulties in paying attention in class, keeping up with school work, forgetfulness and absenteeism. The NHS recommendation is that children of that age should get ten 10 hours sleep per night.The study discovered that out of 1,100 children aged six to 11, 36 per cent were getting eight hours or less sleep on a weekday night.”(more)

Is ADHD a sleep disorder? That would fundamentally change how we treat it

The Star – Ariana Eunjung Cha

“Over the past two decades, U.S. parents and teachers have reported epidemic levels of children with trouble focusing, impulsive behaviour and so much energy that they are bouncing off walls. Educators, policy-makers and scientists have referred to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, as a national crisis and have spent billions of dollars looking into its cause.”(more)

Why teachers should make sleep a priority

The Guardian – Zofia Niemtus

“We all know the stereotype of the coffee-guzzling, yawning teacher – but that image has its roots in the very real stress that early starts and long hours can put on your body. So how can you look after yourself as you adjust to the demanding schedule of school life? We spoke to sleep expert Dr Frances Le Cornu Knight from UCL to find out how to get enough rest.”(more)

Children struggling to concentrate at school due to lack of sleep, MPs told

The Guardian – Sally Weale

“Sleep deprivation is a growing problem in schools, with pupils struggling to concentrate in lessons due to lack of sleep, MPs have been told. Edward Timpson, minister for children and families, highlighted the issue while being questioned by MPs who are investigating the role of education in preventing mental health problems in children and young people. Lack of sleep has been linked to children’s use of mobile phones and tablets late into the night, MPs sitting on the joint inquiry by the Commons health and education committees were told at Wednesday’s hearing.”(more)

Children and adolescents more severely affected by time change

Medical X-Press – Johannes Angerer

“At 2 o’clock in the morning this coming Sunday the clocks will go forward to 3 o’clock – from winter time to summer time. We will therefore “lose” an hour of our normal sleeping time. Many people don’t even notice this “mini jetlag.” However, children and adolescents should be prepared for this change, because they are the most severely affected by it. This was stressed by Gerhard Klösch, sleep researcher at MedUni Vienna’s Department of Neurology. This is partly due to the different physiology of young people and partly to the constant availability of digital devices such as mobiles, tablets or computers. Says Klösch: “Up to the age of 10 we need between ten and eleven hours of restorative sleep and, as adolescent, around nine hours. It’s only when we are older that seven hours sleep is enough.” Scientific studies have shown that the change-over to summer time effectively costs children and adolescents 32 minutes sleep – and this deficit can be repeated daily for a period of two weeks and thus accumulate.”(more)