Amal Clooney Is Helping Lebanese Girls Get An Education

The Huffington Post – Willa Frej “International human rights lawyer Amal Clooney wants to increase educational opportunities for fellow Lebanese women. She has partnered with 100 Lives, an organization seeking to educate people on the Armenian genocide, to annually award a scholarship at the United World College in Dilijan, Armenia. Winners will enroll in a two-year international baccalaureate program…”This scholarship will give young women from Lebanon the opportunity of a lifetime,” Clooney said in a statement. “Cross-cultural learning and studying abroad can be...

The Importance of an International Education for All Students

U.S. Dept. of Education – Mohamed Abdel-Kader “This week is International Education Week — a time when educators, administrators, students, and parents recognize and celebrate the importance of world language learning; study abroad; and an appreciation of different countries and cultures…For students who study a different part of the world, speak a second language, or study abroad, the experience can lead to a better appreciation of the complexity, challenges, and ambiguity, as well as the opportunities, of life in the 21st century. These skills and aptitudes contribute to our young people’s global competency…As important as global competencies are to building a robust educational experience for our students and increasing the cultural understanding of our people, they also are critical tools for individuals navigating a global job market. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that one in five American jobs is tied to global trade; and that number is expected to rise significantly in coming years. As we work to ensure that all students have access to a high-quality education, it is imperative that the experience they have, whether it is during their K-12 years, at a community college, or at a four-year university, gives them the skills to succeed in our increasingly connected, 21st century global...

Extreme Study Abroad: The World Is Their Campus

The New York Times – Claire Cain Miller “As educators question what college should look like in the 21st century, one answer is: global. And to higher education trailblazers, that means more than junior year abroad or overseas internships…Consider one emerging approach, wherein students hop from campus to campus across continents, earning an undergraduate degree in the process…Minerva, which is affiliated with the Keck Graduate Institute, was founded by a former tech executive, Ben Nelson, who believed that traditional colleges were not adequately preparing students for the real world…while majors are offered in the usual fields, like humanities, science and business, the overarching goal is to teach students to think critically and creatively and to communicate and interact well with...

A Global Community’s College

The New York Times – Manny Fernandez “As globalization has made the world smaller, two­ year colleges have, in a sense, gotten bigger. Often regarded as the minor leagues of higher education and as bastions of locally drawn students, community colleges now aggressively recruit students overseas, send their own to study abroad, and have even established satellite campuses in foreign countries…“I sincerely believe by exposing our students and faculty to international linkages, we can prepare our students not just for a single career, but also for a global life of unpredictable velocity and volatility,” said Ms. Do, a former Vietnamese refugee. “A number of studies have shown that American graduates have minimal knowledge of foreign regions and limited ability to communicate in foreign...

US losing its dominance in global higher education market

The Conversation – Jason Lane “The increasing number of students pursuing their college years in a foreign country is symptomatic of two important trends. First, it reflects a rapidly changing world economy, where it is not only the workforce opportunities that are global, but also the educational experiences that prepare students for those opportunities. As a result, more and more students from both developed and developing countries are looking beyond their national borders for their collegiate experience. Second, as economies become more knowledge-based, the competition for brains is heating up. The US has long dominated this market. But as more nations have seen international students as part of their strategic interests, the US market has begun to shrink significantly. Without a similar strategic national interest, will the US’ dominance fall all...

Embrace the world

News Herald – Juliann Talkington The widespread use of computers and the Internet means we interact with people from around the world on a regular basis. Foreign nationals now design and produce many of the products we use. Many jobs that were handled almost exclusively by US citizens have moved to parts of the world where workers are highly educated and have lower salary expectations.   As a result, for our kids to succeed, it is imperative that they not only have advanced math, science and language arts skills, but also have a strong understanding of foreign cultures and languages.   With a lagging economy, getting our kids international exposure seems a bit ominous. Fortunately, it is possible to provide children with a great deal of international experience without leaving town.   First, encourage your child to study geography. Not only does this subject help students place countries in a global perspective, but also helps them understand how cultures take shape. It enables them to know how civilizations are born and helps them understand the interaction between nature and the people that inhabit that area.   Expose your child to a foreign language. Foreign language programs vary in structure and outcome. Language immersion programs, where more than 50% of the instruction is in the foreign language, provide the most cognitive benefit, create an environment where students learn to speak the foreign language without an accent and develop a strong appreciation for the nuances of the culture. Foreign language experience programs, classes that meet for an hour or less several times a week, do not to develop language proficiency, but...