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Hostile teachers can lose students 5 percent on test scores

Science Daily – Staff Writer

“Teachers who antagonize their students by belittling them, showing favoritism, or criticizing their contributions can damage their learning potential, a new study warns. Investigating the influence of teacher ‘misbehavior’ on student learning, a team of communication experts set up a teaching experiment in which almost 500 undergraduate students watched a video of a lecture.” (more)

Learning on the job: how to take your teaching career to the next level

The Guardian – Naomi Larsson

“Teachers, like their students, are always learning. But how can you use this to boost your professional development? Where might you find opportunities to develop leadership skills or take on more responsibility? And how do you get the support you need? In our recent online Q&A, we brought together a panel of experts to share their advice. Here’s a roundup of the discussion.” (more)

Were Teacher Evaluation Reforms a Net Positive or Net Negative?

Education Next – Matthew A. Kraft

“When I present my research on teacher evaluation reforms, I’m often asked whether, at the end of the day, these reforms were a good or bad thing. This is a fair question—and one that is especially important to grapple with given that state policymakers are currently deciding on whether to refine or reject these systems under ESSA. For all the nuanced research and mixed findings that concern teacher evaluation reforms and how teachers’ unions have shaped these reforms on the ground, what is the end result of the considerable time, money, and effort we have invested?.” (more)

New teaching model yields learning improvement for students in math

The Brookings Institute – Michael Hansen and Ben Backes

“Since President Trump took office nearly a year ago, it seems that most of the education news has moved decidedly away from one of the key pillars of the Obama-era education platform: teacher quality. Increasing overall teacher quality, and particularly disadvantaged students’ access to effective teachers, were principles that surfaced time and again from the U.S. Department of Education under the leadership of secretaries Arne Duncan and John King. Though this priority has been set aside at the federal level in favor of school choice initiatives and deregulation, many practitioners in state and district offices have continued to quietly tinker with various reforms to teacher policies and staffing practices.” (more)

Taking on teacher attrition

E-School News – Hilary Scharton

“We once believed that teacher effectiveness dramatically increased for the first three to five years on the job and then plateaued. But recent research suggests that substantial growth in effectiveness can be seen for the first 12 years on the job, and likely longer. This suggests that teacher quality develops over time and that experience can influence effectiveness. We also know that students who have highly effective teachers for three years in a row can score 50 percentile points higher on achievement tests than students who have less effective teachers three years in a row.” (more)

The art of reflection: how to become a more thoughtful educator

The Guardian – Jamie Thom

“Most teachers are passionate about what they do. But research suggests that after the first few years of teaching they can begin to stagnate in their practice. It’s easy for frustrations about making the same mistakes to creep in, and we often look for quick fixes. As Dylan William suggests: “Teachers are like magpies. They love picking up shiny little ideas from one classroom; taking it back to their classroom; trying it once, and then moving on to the next shiny idea.” So how can teachers energise themselves and become more thoughtful educators? I’ve found that taking control of my development through regular reflection and follow-up actions has helped me take ownership of my teaching and better understand how I can improve.” (more)