RSI Corporate - Licensing

A Lasting Impact

Education Next – Thomas S. Dee and James Wyckoff

“Teachers matter—and some matter more than others. That recognition has driven a tidal wave of controversial policy reforms over the past decade, rooted in new evaluation systems that link teachers’ ratings and, in some cases, their pay and advancement to evidence of classroom practice and student learning. Two out of three U.S. states overhauled teacher evaluations between 2009 and 2015, supported by federal incentives such as Race to the Top and Teacher Incentive Fund grants, as well as No Child Left Behind Act waivers.”(more)

‘It Gave Us a Choice When We Didn’t Have One’: Private School Choice Participants Flood Capitol to Tell Their Stories

The 74 Million – Carolyn Phenicie

“Private school choice was among the only education pledges made by President Donald Trump on the campaign trail and has been a decades-long focus of advocacy by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos. Congress reauthorized the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship, the only federally funded program, earlier this year, but like other Trump administration priorities, the odds of any kind of national private school choice program being enacted are looking increasingly slim. The administration proposed a $250 million voucher program in this year’s budget; House Republicans, the caucus that should be most open to the idea, didn’t include the program in its 2018 Education Department spending bill.”(more)

How D.C. Schools Are Revolutionizing Teaching

Education Next – Thomas Toch

“Eric Christopher is the kind of young, gifted, committed teacher that any principal would want to hire. A straight-A student from a public high school on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, he gave up a chance for an Ivy League education to take care of his sick mother and attend nearby Washington College, from which he graduated magna cum laude in 2006. He spent the next seven years at a public elementary school near his hometown, teaching the Spanish-speaking children of agricultural and poultry workers while earning a master’s degree in bilingual education. But opportunities to advance were mostly based on teacher seniority, the pay was low, and he was eager for a fresh challenge in a new environment. So, in 2013, he moved to the big city—Washington, D.C.”(more)

Free The Principal!

NPR – Eric Westervelt

“But too often principals and their deputies have to deal with hundreds of things that have little to do directly with teaching and learning: student discipline, school maintenance, the cafeteria, safety, transportation, paperwork — and lots more. The District of Columbia Public Schools is taking a national lead in trying to change that by adding directors of operations and logistics. The idea is to liberate principals to focus more on teaching evaluation, planning and assessment and far less on milk, leaky faucets or security. Rayamajhi oversees a daunting list of daily needs, from maintenance and security to procurement and HR. Part logistician, part disciplinarian as well as coach and security guard, he roams the hallways and lunch rooms, multi-tasking and talking to everyone, including the nearly 50 employees he manages.”(more)

State of American Pre-K: New Report Shows 1.5 Million Kids (and 1 in 20 3-Year-Olds) Enrolled

The 74 Million – Carolyn Phenicie

“One and a half million American children were enrolled in state-funded preschool programs in the 2015–16 school year, a new high, the annual State of Preschool Yearbook found. The District of Columbia was again the top-ranked jurisdiction for enrollment of 3- and 4-year-olds in state-funded preschool programs and for total spending on those programs, according to the report from the National Institute for Early Education Research, which is affiliated with Rutgers University. D.C. in 2008 passed a landmark law guaranteeing universal preschool to students in the city. Most attend programs run out of district and charter schools, where rigorous standards mean the youngest learners are taught by trained educators and programs are funded at high levels.”(more)

D.C. Approves ESSA Accountability Plan That Emphasizes Testing Standards & Transparency

The 74 Million – Carolyn Phenicie

“Washington, D.C., leaders tonight will consider the city’s final Every Student Succeeds Act plan, previewing fights likely to reoccur across the country as states work toward an early-April deadline for submission to the Department of Education. The plan, written by the office of State Superintendent Hanseul Kang, will come before the nine-member Board of Education, where it will likely pass but not without opposition, primarily over its strong emphasis on test scores. Advocates say the plan is strong: it focuses on student achievement and, responding to community concerns, more heavily weights student growth rates on tests over proficiency. It would rate district and charter schools on the same five-star system — key in a city with a broad school choice movement, universal enrollment, and a lottery system but without an easily understood metric to compare schools now.”(more)