RSI Corporate - Licensing

Kids in Crisis: Putting therapists in schools helps children with mental health needs

The Milwaukee Wisconsin Journal-Sentinel – Rory Linnane and Annysa Johnson

“At this time last year, Monica Pendleton felt like her 5-year-old son was in a constant temper tantrum. She’d get calls from his school: He was screaming or kicking tables and chairs, or both. Teachers were at a loss. Pendleton would have to leave work to pick him up. “The front office knows me and him personally,” Pendleton said.”(more)

New Wisconsin K-12 standards intended to spur interest in computer science careers

USA Today – Jordan C. Axelson

“Computer science is so ubiquitous in our everyday lives that it often goes unnoticed. Take for example, ordering a pizza. Computer science lets you request your pizza with a few taps on your phone; it protects your credit card information during the transaction; and it runs the delivery driver’s GPS, providing the fastest route, so you get the pizza while it’s still hot and melty. Computer science also extends into fields like medicine, communication, and manufacturing. It’s the most in-demand occupation in Wisconsin in 2017, and the sector is expected to grow by 12% through 2024 according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.”(more)

Borsuk: ‘Emergency’ effort to address teacher shortages reflects larger education issues

USA Today – Alan J. Borsuk

“It’s an emergency. It says so right there on the legal papers: “Order of the State Superintendent for Public Instruction Adopting Emergency Rules.” But it’s a curious kind of emergency. Elsewhere in the paperwork, it uses the term “difficulties.” Maybe that’s a better way to put it. Underlying the legal language lie questions that are causing big concern in perhaps every school district and independent school in Wisconsin this summer: Who’s going to fill the remaining open teaching jobs we have? How are we going to put together a staff when some specific positions are proving hard to fill? Are we really getting the best people we feasibly could to work in our classrooms?.”(more)

Wisconsin Could Soon Set The Bar For Personal Finance Education

Forbes – Stacey Leasca

“Just 17 states in the United States require high school students to take a course in personal finance, according to the Council for Economic Education. And while the sheer lack of access to personal finance education may seem abysmal it actually gets worse as according to the report, a mere 20 states required high school students to take a course in economics in 2016, which is actually two fewer states than in 2014. It should come as little surprise then that a 2012 worldwide assessment of young people’s financial literacy found that more than one in six students in the United States failed to reach the baseline level of proficiency. Overall, the Council for Economic Education’s report said, American students fall in the middle of the pack globally, performing on average just behind Latvia and just ahead of Russia. Thankfully, states like Wisconsin are looking to change this statistic by potentially introducing a financial literacy curriculum to its required courses in K-12 schools.”(more)

Borsuk: Character counts — and these 6 schools prove it

The Milwaukee Wisconsin Journal-Sentinel – Alan J. Borsuk

“I like character education for two simple reasons: One is that there are so many schools where the atmosphere created by the way people treat each other impedes education. This goes not only for how kids act but for how adults in the school sometimes treat kids — and other adults. (I’ve witnessed these things.) So much class time in so many schools is taken up with behavior problems. More broadly, a positive school culture leads to more positive outcomes. The other is that I am convinced the well-designed efforts around character and conduct can make differences. It is possible to create a more positive atmosphere in a school. Intentional efforts around character education can be a part of that. South Milwaukee offers strong evidence of two of the most important traits of a successful character program: persistence and pervasiveness.”(more)