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Computer Science is everywhere in our world but almost nowhere in California schools

Ed Source – ALLISON SCOTT, ART LOPEZ AND SUSAN BONILLA

“California leads the world in technological innovation, and our economy benefits from a tech sector that generates more than $520 billion annually. Nearly 2 million Californians have already staked their claim in the state’s growing tech workforce with no end in sight. There are about 68,000 computing jobs currently available that earn above-average yearly salaries of $115,754.” (more)

Report finds early education critical for fostering women in engineering careers

Create Digital – Katie Goss

“Unlike professions such as law and medicine, engineering hasn’t come close to achieving gender equality across its industry. Despite women making up 47 per cent of all employed people in Australia, in engineering, they only make up 12 per cent of the workforce and 16 per cent of students studying at universities. “If we want more women to choose higher education in engineering, we need more girls to engage with engineering,” said the Australian Government Women in STEM Ambassador Professor Lisa Harvey-Smith, a supporter of the Engineering for Australia Taskforce report.” (more)

More maths testing could be good for primary schoolchildren – if done in the right way

The Conversation – Kinga Morsanyi

“Research suggests that, in general, there are two main culprits when it comes to failure in maths. One is developmental dyscalculia – a specific learning disorder, which affects about one in 20 children. The other is maths anxiety, which is an even more common problem. According to a large-scale international study, about one in three adolescents get very nervous when they have to do maths.” (more)

Motivation for sports and school go hand in hand for adolescent athletes

Science Daily – Staff Writer

“Successfully integrating elite sports with education requires motivation to commit oneself to both domains. In Europe, the EU has instructed its Member States to formulate and adopt national guidelines on dual careers of athletes. Sufficient policy actions are needed in support of combining elite sports with academic education. In Finland, for example, talented and elite adolescent athletes have the opportunity to complete their upper secondary education in special sports upper secondary schools, which offer equal competitive sport opportunities for both genders and often specialise in multiple sports.” (more)

Can Administrators Ensure the Ethical Use of AI in K–12 Education?

Ed Tech Magazine – Rebecca Torchia

“As with many technologies used in K–12 learning environments, school leaders must guarantee that artificial intelligence is safe. In addition to the legal requirements placed on districts, there are ethical issues schools must consider before introducing new tech powered by AI and machine learning (ML).” (more)

10 Rules Kids Should Adhere To When Riding Their Bike To School

Moms – Ashley Wehrli

“School is one of the most important places for a child to be. It is a place where they can learn and grow, both academically and socially, and while every child has a right to be in school, they usually have to figure out how they are going to get there. When a child is young, it will usually either be a parent/guardian who ensures that the child gets to school, but as they get older, they may want to explore their own independence a bit.” (more)

How Blockchain Can Encourage Learning

Ed Surge – Josh Weiss and Zoha Salman

“Blockchain has gotten plenty of attention lately as a new mode of exchange, allowing experimental cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin and the sale of NFTs in ways that leave an unalterable, fully transparent public record that tracks the transfer and ownership of digital things. ” (more)

High school students’ interest in humanities outpaces other subjects

K-12 Dive – Anna Merod

“High school students’ interest in the humanities is outpacing other academic fields, according to new research by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, which analyzed course credits and AP data from the U.S. Department of Education and College Board.” (more)