RSI Corporate - Licensing

China cuts tax to boost innovation

China Daily- XINHUA

“BEIJING — China cuts more than 300 billion yuan ($46.15 billion) of taxes in 2015 to boost mass entrepreneurship and innovation, according to official data.
Among this, tax exemptions and breaks on small enterprises reached 100 billion yuan and tax cuts designed to encourage high technology development totaled 140 billion yuan, according to the State Administration of Taxation.”(more)

Creative new teaching method brings ‘hero moments’ to students in south-west Sydney

NEWS- Nick Dole

“A new teaching method being trialled in New South Wales, which incorporates games and physical theatre, is allowing each student a chance to shine.High school teacher Catherine Myers said she used to dread her Monday morning science class.For the past 10 weeks she has been part of a trial involving a new teaching method, which involves students spending less time reading and writing, and more time on their feet.”They’re doing it through theatre, through games, through play rather than books and writing,” she said.She said there had been a “monumental” improvement in results.”(more)

Innovation and creativity: Australia needs an innovation ‘skunkworks’

The Conversation- Marcus Foth from Queensland University of Technology

“Malcolm Turnbull has been heralded as the new “innovation PM”. Expectations are high that he must now translate his rhetoric around agility, disruption, entrepreneurship into concrete economic policies.Both Glenn Withers, Professor of Economics at Australian National University, and myself have argued that we need not just STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics), but also researchers from the social sciences, arts, design and the humanities contributing to innovation.Several commentators have called for better support of innovation, such as Mark Dodgson, Director, Technology and Innovation Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Tony Peacock, Chief Executive of the Cooperative Research Centres Association, Glyn Davis, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Melbourne, and Jenny Stewart, Professor of Public Policy, UNSW Australia.”(more)

Innovate or perish: What Turnbull’s statement means for Australian research

OPINION- Alan Duffy

“In science, there is a motto, “publish or perish”, which is a reflection of how we define success – simply the number of papers you publish in high quality journals. If you don’t publish enough, then you will struggle to find research funds.After today, perhaps science has a new one, “innovate or perish”, a motto that could be shared with the nation as a whole.As announced in the Turnbull Government’s innovation statement, the metrics by which researchers will be judged (and ultimately universities funded) are to be broadened to include engagement impact, where research activities will also take into account those efforts to work with industry and ultimately commercialise discoveries.”(more)

IBM granted most U.S. patents in 2015, study finds

REUTERS- Reporting by Anya George Tharakan in Bengaluru; Editing by Cynthia Osterman

“International Business Machines Corp (IBM.N) was granted the most U.S. patents for the 23rd year in a row in 2015, according to a ranking by patent analysis firm IFI Claims Patents Services.There were 298,407 utility patents granted in 2015, down slightly from 2014, IFI Claims said on Wednesday. IBM gained 7,355 patents last year. Utility patents cover function rather than design.Among the technology giants notable for their intellectual property, Alphabet Inc’s (GOOGL.O) Google stepped up its patent activity, moving to the fifth position from eighth in 2014, while Apple Inc (AAPL.O) stayed at the 11th position.”(more)